Malcolm Stewart of Achmark-beg

Uchdnanetaig, Strathtummel

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Malcolm Stewart of Achmark-beg was the eldest son of John Stewart of Inverslanie and his second wife, Isobel Robertson, the sister of Donald Robertson of Killchangie (Kilchenzie) whose marriage contract was dated 18th March 1680. There is documentation showing that he had two younger brothers, Alexander and John and at least two sisters, the second one being named Isobel. As was the custom, Malcolm was named after his paternal grandfather Malcolm Stewart of Inverslanie who died 12th January 1657 and had been married to Janet McDuff.

Probably, Malcolm was born around 1681 and as eldest son his father would have made him financially secure by obtaining a wadsett. Although no documentation has come to light it is fairly certain that Malcolm had the wadsett for Achmark-beg as, in 1705, he was paying the stipend for Achmark-beg and Sean-bhaile (Sheneval of Glentilt). His younger brother Alexander was paying the stipend for Inverslanie, Achmark-more and Craigdearg as, in 1704, Alexander Stewart had obtained a bond from the Duke of Atholl for Inverslanie and Achmark-more, in exchange for 2,000 merks. Although the wadsett loans meant that the men were entitles to be styled as 'of Achmark-beg' and 'of Inverslanie', the Fencible List of January 1705 shows that Alexander and Malcolm were farming Achmark-more. Inverslanie itself was tenanted by Alexander Forbes, Donald Toshach (McIntosh) with Alexander Gilbert, a farm servant. Achmark-beg, which included Sean-bhaile (meaning the old township), was tenanted by John Robertson, Donald Stewart and Neil Stewart with a farm servant, William Stewart.

Malcolm's father, John Stewart of Inverslanie, must have died before 1708 as in March of that year Malcolm was given discharges (receipts) by his two brothers and his sister, for their share of their father's assets. Alexander's portion is unspecified, but John received 550 merks Scots and Isobell received 300 merks Scots (GD132/230/1-3, National Records of Scotland). No actual money changed hands as Malcolm gave his sister a bond payable a Martinmass of that year. However, nothing was paid until 1710 when Malcolm paid the annual rent (interest) on the principal amount and in addition paid 100 Scots, which was half of what he owed. He gave a new bond to his sister promising to pay the remaining 100 Scots by Martinmass 1711, and in case of failure there was a penalty of 20 Scots money (GD132/235/1, National Records of Scotland). Perhaps Isobell needed money urgently, or perhaps she was worried that her brother would default, but whatever the reason, she assigned her bond to Mr James Murray, writer in Edinburgh, in June 1711 for which she received a cash payment (GD132/235/2, National Records of Scotland).

Malcolm probably married in 1709. His bride was Janet Robertson, the only daughter of the deceased John Robertson, former Tutor of Lude, and his second wife Isobel Robertson. When the Tutor of Lude died it seems likely that he willed 1,000 merks Scots to his daughter Janet (as her tocher or marriage money?) which, as there were no banks, she lent to her cousin John Robertson of Lude for safety.

Bond by the Laird of Lude to Janet Robertson for 1000 merks, 1708 (GD132/231/1, National Records of Scotland).

I, John Robertson, Laird of Lude grant me to have borrowed and received at the term of Martinmass last by precept(?) not withstanding of the law hereof from Janet Robertson, lawful daughter of the deceased John Robertson, Tutor of Lude, all and whole, the sum of one thousand merks Scots money whereof I grant receipt and hold me well content and satisfied and paid renouncing expressly the exception of not ..... money and all other objections of the law that can be proponed or alledged in the contract hereof for now and ever which sum of one thousand merks money foresaid, I the said John Robertson by this puts, binds and oblige me, my heirs, successors and ..... with my land rents, goods and gear in what form ever, thankfully to ..... and pay to the said Janet Robertson, her heirs, executors, assignees with a year's annual rent thereof set and against the term of Martinmass next to come, one thousand seven hundred and nine years, with the sum of one hundred pounds money foresaid of liquidal expenses in case of failure together also with the due and ordinary annual rent of the said principal sum yearly and termly thereafter during not payment after the term of payment annual with (reserving to Isobell Robertson, mother to the said Janet Robertson her life-rent right and use of the ordinar annual rent of four hundred merks of the principal sum .... during all the years and days of her lifetime) providing always as it is hereby provided and declared that the said Janet Robertson shall grant and subscribe to the said John Robertson, his heirs and successors and ..... and discharge of her whole interest to the ..... of Easter Monzie by virtue of a contract of wadsett dated at Moulin the sixth day of December jaj vi and ninety years .... betwixt him and the deceased John Robertson, Tutor of Lude, her father, ... to and in the term of an obligation granted for that effect by her to the said John Robertson of the date of these present. And for the more formally I am content and consent this .... be ... and registered in the Books of Council and Session or in any other judges books competent within this Kingdom to have the strength of their ..... that ... of horning .... and all ........ ...... may be direct hereon in form as ...... and for the ................ whereof I have subscribed the .... with my hand in Balnagaird........ the eighteenth day of December one thousand seven hundred and eight years before these witnesses: Mr Duncan Stewart, minister of the Gospel at Blair Atholl. Alexander Stewart, writer in Kindrochit and Mr Archibald Campbell

Two days later John Robertson of Lude assigned the same bond to Malcolm Stewart of Achmark, either as Janet's husband, or as her promised husband. The bond was redeemed 28th December 1711 (GD132/231/2, National Records of Scotland). Janet Robertson must have died soon afterwards as she is not mentioned again.

On the same day that Janet Robertson requested that the Laird of Lude assign her bond to her promised husband, both she and Malcolm Stewart signed a discharge to Isobell Robertson, Janet's mother. This document states that their marriage contract contained a clause by which everything that Malcolm and Janet possessed would be equally split in the event of their separation. Thus, when Janet died, Malcolm's mother-in-law was entitled to half. The document also mentions that her son Charles was deceased, which probably explains why Malcolm Stewart moved into Easter Monzie and took out a tack (lease) in conjunction with his mother-in-law, who had a life-rent on Easter Monzie. (GD132/232, National Records of Scotland). It is worth noting that this is not the Charles Robertson in Easter Monzie who had a testament recorded by the Commissary of Dunkeld 22nd August 1727.

When Sir John Erskine, the Earl of Marr, raised the standard of rebellion for James Edward Stuart, the Old Pretender, in 1715, hundreds of Atholl men joined the cause, including Alexander Stewart of Inverslanie and his brother Malcolm. Alexander was taken prisoner at the Battle of Sheriffmuir and Malcolm surrendered at Preston. Malcolm Stewart of Achmark-beg was tried for treason, 27th January 1716 and sentenced to death. On 31st January 1716 he wrote to his mother-in-law from Liverpool (GD132/805/1, National Records of Scotland).

Dear Mother

My being in the last extremes, I hope will excuse what may be amiss in this my line seeing I did not expect to write after this form to you, for which I hope you will not be surprised seeing it is very certain that we must all die. I was here arraigned before the court for High Treason, where I was found guilty, for which I was sentenced to die. However, I entreat you, seeing I know your sincerity and goodness to me from the beginning, to pay all my debts out of the first part of my moveables, and as for the rest of them, I leave them to yourself, wherefore I have here inserted a list of debts that I am resting and likewise resting to me.

Resting to Neill Stewart in Achmark-beg per bond, one hundred merks Scots money.
Resting to Donald McIntosh in Inverslanie, one hundred merks money foresaid.
Resting to John Gow, West Mains of Blair, one hundred merks money foresaid.
Resting to Robert Robertson in Tomnaguie, fifty merks money foresaid.
Resting to Charles Robertson in Easter Monzie, twenty-six pounds money foresaid.
Resting to John Robertson, servant to John Young in Balmeanach, twenty pounds money foresaid.
Resting to John Stewart of Dalvorest, thirty pounds money foresaid.
Resting to James McLauchlan, my servant, twenty merks money foresaid.

Resting to me, by my brother Alexander, forty-six pounds money foresaid.
Resting to me, by Donald Stewart of Duntaulich, twenty-four merks money foresaid.
Resting to me, by John McGlashan in Urchil-beg, ten pounds money foresaid.

I hereby ordain you to have the annual rent of four hundred merks money foresaid, yearly during your lifetime. not withstanding of what is contained in my contract of marriage, and all the duties belonging to me for this year. I likewise ordain one thousand merks money foresaid to be given to my brother John, and five hundred merks to my nephew John and four hundred merks to my nephew Malcolm, whereof the annual rent of eight hundred merks is to accross and belong to my good mother of what my two nephews and to have if(?) failzwing heirs of John's own body the ... said one thousand merks is to be equally divided betwixt my said nephews. Remember I should give to Neill McGlashan(1) yearly of superplus duty, two pound money foresaid whereof two years are resting. And for any other thing of servant fees and master's duty, I leave it to yourself to see it paid. I intreat you give my service to my brother and his children and all others of God friends and relations not forgetting yourself. Recommending you all to God, I am your affectionate son to death, Ma: Steuart

Written on the outside of the letter is the same list of creditors, but all the amounts are in pounds Scots, amounting to 322 13s 4d Scots. The letter is addressed "Isabell Robertson in Easter Monzie in Atholl to the care of Finlay Ferguson, North Britain"

(1) Superplus duty was the sum of money owed after the annual interest on a wadsett had been deducted from the annual rent of a property. Neill McGlashan had been the Duke of Atholl's Chamberlain but, unbeknown to Malcolm, he also had become involved in the 1715 rebellion, was taken prisoner at Sheriffmuir, and had lost his position with the Duke of Atholl.

The Newcastle Courant, 20th February 1716, lists the prisoners taken at Preston and Malcolm appears on page 3. "Malcolm Stewart of Preston, Lancashire, gentleman, found guilty and condemned, time of execution unknown". All the Scots were said to be 'of Preston' as their certain place of abode, in their own country, was unknown. With dates set for the first of the prisoners to be executed, "all the prisoners at Lancaster, above 300, submitted to the King's Mercy, and petitioned for transportation; most of the rebels in Chester Castle have done the like".

Malcolm's death sentence was commuted to transportation to the colonies and he was sent to Yorktown, Virginia, among 126 Jacobite prisoners on board the 'Elizabeth and Ann' which left Liverpool 29th June 1716 and was listed as an indentured servant. It is fairly clear that some of the prisoners awaiting transportation bought their freedom and quietly returned home.

Deposition of James Urquhart, one of the prisoners brought to Virginia in the ship 'Elizabeth and Anne' from Liverpool: giving account of the means by which a number of fellow prisoners were allowed, "by the Master of the vessel, to escape at the Cove of Cork and elsewhere" - that he himself had bargained for his liberty by agreeing to give the officers of the ship a certain sum of money in guineas, a watch and a "stone ring" but being in irons, the Captain was afraid the noise incident to striking them off, might excite suspicion on the part of the other officers".

Others, upon arrival in Virginia, used the law to question the legality of their indenture.

Deposition of Thomas Forster. "Unto his Excellency Col. Spottiswood, Governour of Virginia. The humble representation of the Gentlemen, and others, prisoners transported aboard the 'Elizabeth and Anne' of Liverpool from Britain to York in Virginia. Whereas, perfunt to the orders of the Government we are brought to this place, which as is humbly conceited is all that in Law we are obliged to perform, notwithstanding to our great surprise we were not only before our comeing off from Liverpool, but ever since our arrival in this Country, are menaced and threatened to be bound in a servitude of a certain number of years, yea and a good many of us already actually disposed of. And all this to make up a sum of money for Sir Thomas Johnston, Parliament man for Liverpool (who pretends a right to us) and some other merchants concerned with him in this matter. Wherefore we are obliged to apply ourselves in all submissiveness to your Excellency for Justice, seeing we humbly imagine that upon our being transported to this place, the intent of the Goverment to be fulfilled, and no more liable to any further punishment, since by the known laws of Britain, not only in the reign of the late King Charles, but more particularly extended, ratified and approven in the eight year of the late King William, that even in cases of treason and rebellion, no man can be transported out of the Kingdom, unless he be first judicially convicted of the crime, and likewise give his free consent to the transportation in open Court. Far less can any British Subject, without consenting thereto, be sold or obliged to serve for any space of years unless the former Laws were either altogether abrogate or the effect of them suspended for a certain time, neither of which as we conceive can here be pretended. We are all of us now taken from aboard the ship, and the remaining part of us imprisoned in York town (where our entertainment is but very ordinary) except seven or eight of our number, who each of them paid the Master of the ship, five guineas for their passage, who are still detained aboard, upon what design we conceive not, only two of that number excepted, John Stewart and William Maxwell, who upon Sunday last were carried from aboard, and taken up the river upon what design we know not. It is therefore hoped your Excellency will consider our present circumstances and give such orders for our liberation as in justice you shall see fit, or be pleased to call one or two of our number before you and hear us upon the subject". (Copied from Calendar of Virginia State Papers and Other Manuscripts 1652-1781)

Others bought out their indenture, and as it is known that Malcolm had money sent to him on at least two occassions, so he may have used it to secure release from his 7-year indenture. Afterwards, like many of his fellow prisoners, he probably would be easily accepted by the Virginia colony which needed able men.

Although Malcolm had attempted to settle his affairs in Scotland, some of his debtors refused to honour their bonds as shown by a latter dated 19th July 1731 (GD132/805/2, National Records of Scotland).

To Malcolm Steuart in Virginia

Some time ago, I had occassion to deliver your letter of attourney to your brother Inverslanie who was pleased to show it me with its cover, wherein you desire him to deal kindly and honourably with your mother in law.

She, upon delivering your papers to Inverslanie, desired to clear accounts betwixt you and her which it seems they could not adjust without help of friends, wherefore they have entered into a submission to four gentlemen who have power to determine the matter.

No doubt you remember the will and commission you sent her from Liverpool in the year 1716, by virtue of which she disposed of what effect you had in her hands, and paid your debts to a greater value than what she made of her intromissions with your effects, some of your debtors refusing to pay her, among whom was your brother Inverslanie.

I wrote you by the way of Maryland to the care of William Robertson there, which to refers. I then gave you a salum of the currant accounts as it then stood betwixt you and her, by which there was a balance due to her (if I remember right) of 15 Sterling, including the year's annuity of 20 merks Scots you was pleased to add, in the fore-mentioned will, to what she was provided to by your contract of marriage.

I believe that the arbeters will have little or no difficulty to settle matters betwixt them, except in relation to that letter you sent her from Liverpool, alleging it's not binding in law on yourself or executors unless you corroborate the same in a new letter which you may direct for me, who am now living at Dunkeld, postmaster.

Meantime, give me leave to remind you (being now so long at a great distance from your relations) that this honest woman behaved herself descreetly and was always a kind and obliging mother to you. She likeways owns that you never failzed in your reciprocal duty to her, which I humbly think ought to be continued, believing at least you and whomsoever you give power to, of raising your money out of the Duke of Atholl's hands, to pay the balance of accounts to your mother in law, together with the said 20 merks per annum.

Those who advanced the 20 Sterling for you in Anno 1717 and remitted it to London for your use, expects you. I likeways ordered their payment with interest. I hope you'll be pleased to give us the satisfaction of a letter from you by the first occassion, and let us understand how you live and whether married or if you have any thoughts of returning to your native country.

If Malcolm Stewart's debts had been paid immediately, as he desired, all would have been well. But as some of his debtors prevented this from happening, there was a severe problem. Annual interest on bonds was set at only 5% percent but after 22 years of non-payment, the interest exceeded the original loan, as shown by a list of Malcolm Stewart's debt as at 25th May 1732 (GD132/257, National Records of Scotland).

List of debts and their vouchers due by Malcolm Steuart, brother to Alexander Steuart, who now resides in Virginia, as follows:

To Donald MacIntosh in Inverslanie per bond of principle..............................................................................66 13s 4d
Interest thereof from Martinmass 1710 to Martinmass 1732, being 22 years...................................................72 13s
To Neill Steuart in Achmark-beg per bond...................................................................................................66 13s 4d
Interest thereof from Martinmass 1710 to Martinmass 1732, being 22 years...................................................72 13s
To Alexander Steuart, the equal half of a conjunct bond of two hundred merks per bond...................................66 13s 4d
Interest of it from Martinmass 1712 to Martinmass 1732, being 20 years........................................................67 6s 8d
To John McLauchlan in Wester Monzie, the equal half of a conjunct bond for three hundred merks....................100
Interest of it from Martinmass 1715 to Martinmass 1732, being 17 years........................................................85
To seventeen sundry persons, money advanced for the use of the said Malcolm Stewart, each being 25 merks...283 6s 8d
Interest of said sum for 14 years, to the third of March last.........................................................................198 6s 8d
The balance of accounts due to Isobell Robertson, the relict of the Tutor of Lude, as at Candlemass 1726..........179 1s 8d

(Total).................................................................................................................................................1258 7s

On 7th July the Lairds of Lude and Fincastle sat as Judge Arbitrators to resolve the situation, and Isobell Robertson presented the following claim and representation (GD132/258, National Records of Scotland).

Representation for Isobell Robertson, relict of the Tutor of Lude, in a submission by John Steuart, attorney to Malcolm Stewart, her son in law.

There is a scheme of a current account betwixt the two parties made up in the year 1726 by which the said Malcolm appears to be debtor to the widow for the sum of 179 1s 8d Scots

The widow affirms she was very much disposed to make a public sale of all the goods etc that was in the company twixt her son in law and her, immediately after she had account of his going abroad. But his brother Inverslanie sent his son John to the now deceased John Robertson of Lude intreating him to prevail with the widow not to dispose of the horses, at least of the best of them, for some time until they knew if Malcolm designed to return again, which she complied with, so far as to keep seven piece of horses unsold. All which horses perished some time thereafter, five of them by the morning of the claim and two by falls over rocks and precipices.

There appears a bond of Malcolm's, in favour of his mother in law, dated in the year 1711 wherein he gives her a right of 20 merks a year during her lifetime, without making any mention of the Contract of Marriage, thereby she a right to another 20 merks a year and therefore it seems he designed it as an addition which he confirms by his letter from Liverpool in the year 1716.

If the judges scruple to determine anything in relation to the contents of the said letter from Liverpool, the widow expect the judges will except the fulfilling the will thereof in their decreet arbitrall till they see if Malcolm will be pleased to give a return to a letter write to him last year, desiring him to give his own mind in a line to Alexander Robertson at Dunkeld, signifying how he would have his executor or attorney to treat his mother in law.

Lastly, the widow now hopes the judges will observe and find it reasonable, the balance etc that was due to her in the year 1726, ought to carry interest and therefore it is accumulate on the foot of the old scheme, amounting at Candlemass last to the sum of three hundred and five pounds, seven shillings and four pennies Scots. And then take care the widow be secured in time coming in her annuity out of Malcolm's effects.

In addition, Isobell Robertson presented her accounts concerning her attempts to repay Malcolm Stewart's creditors (GD132/249, National Records of Scotland).

Isobell Robertson, relict of the Tutor of Lude, having married her only daughter to Malcolm Steuart, brother to Alexander Steuart of Inverslanie, did among other things, by a clause in the contract of marrriage, disponed the equal half of all outsight and insight goods and plenishing that were on the room and house at the time of their separation. On the other hand Malcolm is bound to give her, all the days of her lifetime, yearly after separation, the annual rent of four hundred merks Scots.

As also he, by his missive by way of will dated at Liverpool the 31st January 1716, orders his mother in law to dispose of all his part of moveables and uplift any debts was owing to him, with which she was to pay the said Malcolm, his debts pro tanto. Likewise he provides her in the yearly annual rent of another four hundred merks during her life, wherefore in obedience and compliance to the contract and letter Isobell Robertson required Inverslanie and his son to come and witness the disposing of everything, but they refused. Therefore she went on in presence of sundry honest men and neighbours as follows.

N.B. Malcolm's wife died childless some years before.

May 1716, account of corn, horses, nolt, sheep etc sold and disposed of publicly, being in equal halves betwixt Malcolm Steuart and Isobell Robertson, his mother in law, relict of the Tutor of Lude.

To Neill Steuart in Urchil-beg, a cow and calf ......................................................22
To John Menzies in Dysart, a cow ......................................................................20
To Isobell Robertson, 2 cow and a stirk ..............................................................36
To ditto, 2 little quey (laoigh) at 9 each ............................................................18
To ditto, 2 little stirks, one at 4 the other 8 merks ...............................................9 6s 8d
To Patrick Soar(?), a mare ...............................................................................20
To Donald Saggard(?), a horse, old ...................................................................16
To Patrick McGlashan, one ditto ........................................................................15 6s 8d
To Isobell (Robertson), a horse, 25 years of age ...................................................2
To ditto, a mare and foal, long lost ....................................................................12
To ditto, two fillies at 10 each .........................................................................20
To Robert Moncrieff, of sheep to the value ..........................................................66 13s 4d
To Charles Robertson in Monzie, (sheep) for .......................................................28
To Isobell (Robertson), 2 old ewes and 9 hogs, value ...........................................14 13s 4d

1717

10 goats, 3 gelded goats, sold at .......................................................................19 16s
A buck, sold at ..................................................................................................5 6s 8d
All to Donald McConnach, the rest valued ............................................................10 13s 4d
Corns sown in the year 1716 .............................................................................35 16s
12 bolls computed (to produce) 3 times is 36 bolls valued at 5 6s 8d per boll ...... 192

Total ............................................................................................................533 16s

The one half placed to Malcolm's account current................................................266 18s Scots

Account of household furniture and utensils, valued by Patrick McGlashan, wright, Charles Robertson and John Robertson in Monzie, (and Alexander Robertson of Carnoustie - see GD132/249) as follows viz

9 pair creels, 6 pair curells, sumuck, strathers ....................................................3 8s 8d
A plough with 2 pair of irons, spade, hand shovel, grape ......................................5 18s 8d
A crook grate and tongs, little potty and bowl, house door ....................................3 18s
5 small doors, 2 scales, 6 cogs, 3 beakers, a firlot (measure), stoup,
A reaming dish, two handed tub and 2 kinkans ...................................................6 6s 8d
An old manger, a crib and sheep hake .....................................................................8s
In the west room, a chest, old bed ...................................................................10
6 boards, a wand chest ....................................................................................4 10s
In the hall, an amery and little chest ..................................................................6
An old rotten bed, a table chair .........................................................................2 6s 8d
An old table, 2 old big chairs and little ones ........................................................4 13s 4d
A deal runwall, a standing bed, 2 chests ...........................................................12 6s 8d
5 half-worn saks, 20 ells at 3s 4d per ell ............................................................3 6s 8d
2 half-worn canmasses, 20 ells at ditto ..............................................................3 6s 8d
Bed clothes and linings etc, guessed to.............................................................20

Total ...........................................................................................................86 10s

The one half of this being 43 5s Scots is placed to Malcolm's account .................43 5s

By cash, from Duntaulich received ...................................................................16
By ditto, from John McGlashan in Urchil-beg .......................................................8

Total ............................................................................................................24

The one half of this being 12 Scots is placed to Malcolm's account ......................12

Account of debts paid by Isobell Robertson for and on an account of Malcolm Steuart

To Dalvorest per discharge, December 1721, .....................................................33 6s 8d
To Alexander Robertson in Tomnaguie per discharge, December 1721, ..................33 6s 8d
To John Robertson in Tomb of Strathgarry, January 1722, ....................................21 10s
To Charles Robertson in Monzie, December 1721, ...............................................28
To James Robertson, stalker, December 1721, ....................................................16 13s 4d
To James McLachlane in Knock, December 1721, ................................................33 6s 8d
To John Gow per bond and assignation, December 1721, .....................................80
To Thomas Boyd per receipt ...............................................................................3 6s 8d
To John Gow in the Haugh of Blair ......................................................................8
To Elspeth McKenzie for geese his dogs killed .......................................................4
The one half of Malcolm McLachlane's hire ...........................................................3
The one half of the duty of crops 1715 ..............................................................20
The one half of the year's stipends etc ................................................................1 4s 8d
The one half of that year's cess ..........................................................................1
The one half of Alexander Robertson's hire ..........................................................3
The one half of Janet Steuart's fee .....................................................................1 10s

Total ...........................................................................................................291 4s 8d

To five years of my annuity not paid 1715 to 1721 by contract and bond ................66 13s 4d
To ten years of annuity of addition ordered by your letter from Castle Jan 1716......133 6s 8d
To cash advanced for you to Mr Mungo Campbell, remitted to you from London........16 13s 4d
To America with eight years annual rent thereof.....................................................6 13s 4d

The opposite balance (i.e. owing) ....................................................................179 1s 8d*
To 5 years annuity of the additional 400 merks annual rent from
Candlemass 1726 to Candlemass 1731 at 20 merks .............................................66 13s 4d
To 5 years annual rent of the 16 13s 4d paid to Mr Mungo Campbell .......................4 3s 4d
To 5 years annual rent of the former balance 179 1s 8d to the term
of Candlemass 1731 .........................................................................................44 15s
Another likewise annual rent of total sum to Candlemass last past 1732 ..................10 14s

(Total owed to Isabell Robertson) ......................................................................305 7s 4d

* This figure seems to incorrect, but on the last page the summary shows that in 1715 Isobell Robertson received 13 6s 8d in cash, as a years annuity from Neill Steuart in Achmark-beg, without receipt.

John Kerr notes that in 1733 the wadsett on Achmark-beg was redeemed for 1,900 merks, following the death of John Stewart of Inverslanie. However the wadsett for Achmark-beg must have been in Malcolm's name as he was paying superplus for it in 1716, and the redemption of the 1,900 merks probably relates to the money mentioned in the letter sent to Virginia in July 1731.

Meantime, give me leave to remind you (being now so long at a great distance from your relations) that this honest woman behaved herself descreetly and was always a kind and obliging mother to you. She likeways owns that you never failzed in your reciprocal duty to her, which I humbly think ought to be continued, believing at least you and whomsoever you give power to, of raising your money out of the Duke of Atholl's hands, to pay the balance of accounts to your mother-in-law, together with the said 20 merks per annum.

The sum of 1,900 merks was equivalent to about 1,266 Scots, so this should have been sufficient to clear all of Malcolm's debts and obligations, giving him peace to continue a new life in a new country.